WW1HA annual symposium

The World War One Historical Association 
Annual Symposium Details & Registration
 
October 21-22, 2016 
MacArthur Memorial
Norfolk, VA
                                           1916: Sex, Planes, and Disasters!
                                        
Our 2016 Annual Symposium in Norfolk, VA is fast approaching! The full registration package at $255 includes all presentations, the Friday dinner banquet and the must-see Friday afternoon tour of the Military Aviation Museum in Virginia Beach including
transportation/snacks/beverages, docent-led tours, & a pilot talk.  (http://www.militaryaviationmuseum.org)

                                       World War One Aircraft at the Museum
 
Raffle Prize: Autographed Chicago Blackhawks Hockey Stick!
 

We are also offering an amazing raffle prize: a hockey stick autographed by members of the 2015 Stanley Cup Champion Chicago Blackhawks, along with a Certificate of Authenticity. The 86th Infantry Division of the American Expeditionary Force, known as the Blackhawks, was established in August 1917 at Camp Grant in Rockford IL and was composed of men from Illinois and Wisconsin. Frederick McLaughlin served as a commander in the 86th Infantry Division. In 1926 he was granted a franchise by the National Hockey League, which he named the Chicago Blackhawks for his unit and his home town.

Raffle tickets will be $10 each or 3 for $25, sold only at the symposium. The drawing will be during the luncheon on Saturday – you must be present to win! As a reference price, a stick signed by the 2012 team for a charity auction is currently for sale online for $1200. 
Registration Information
Can’t attend the full symposium?  We are offering one day options, both with and without the dinner, and just the tour of the Military Aviation Museum. 
Register online at http://ww1ha.org/2016-symposium-registration/or download the mail-in registration form at http://ww1ha.org/downloads/Symposium2016Flyer.pdf
Our main 2016 symposium page is http://ww1ha.org/2016-annual-conference/.
Want more details? The full Symposium Program book with all registration options and all program details and speaker information is available now at http://ww1ha.org/downloads/2016SymposiumProgram.pdf
All presentations will be held at the MacArthur Memorial. There is lots of information about about the museum and its programs at http://www.macarthurmemorial.org/.
For hotel reservations at the Sheraton Norfolk please call 757-640-2752 ask for Christine or Chelsea or send an email to Christine.Palmer@norfolksheraton.comBe sure to ask for the WW1HA room block and special rate. Our symposium daily rate of $129.68 per night includes all taxes and free WiFi.  Hotel parking is $8 per day.Norfolk has many wonderful attractions to visit beyond the MacArthur Memorial – Plan your additional activities at http://www.visitnorfolktoday.com/

 

Questions? Contact Dana Lombardy at dana.lombardy@gmail.com or at 510-301-0753 during Pacific Time business hours.  

‘COUNTDOWN TO VETERANS DAY’

From Chris Isleib of the U.S. World War One Centennial Commission
OUR ‘COUNTDOWN TO VETERANS DAY’ HAS BEGUN!
Today is Wednesday, September 21, fifty days away from Veterans Day. 
We feel that one day per year is not enough to talk about veterans, veterans contributions, and veterans needs. So, for the next fifty days, we will join others in posting about veterans, using the #CountdownToVeteransDayhas htag.
We also feel that we can help people to have a more meaningful experience for their Veterans Day, by collecting an easy list of opportunities to volunteer, donate, or participate in local events. We have posted our list here – www.CountdownToVeteransDay. org
We invite you to join us in this Countdown To Veterans Day. Please feel free to repost or retweet any of the #CountdownToVeteransDay social media posts, or create your own, to help us get the word out.
Veterans needs, and veterans issues, will always need our help.

 

Chris Isleib

U.S. World War One Centennial Commission

Director of Public Affairs
301 641 4060
www.ww1cc.org/design
https://www.facebook.com/ww1centennial

 

News for New Yorkers

You’ll be interested in this nes if you’ll be in the Big Apple on Saturday.

NEW YORK – There will be a host of World War I-related activities this Saturday at NYC’s Governors Island. A platoon of living history reenactors will bring World War I Doughboys to Governors Island National Monument on Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016, for a free exhibition. See demonstrations and hear stories as reenactors portray famous New York regiments, including the Harlem Hell Fighters, at Doughboy Day at Fort Jay.
The centennial of American involvement in the “Great War” is in 2017 and this group of volunteer reenactors will share the story of U.S. participation. Both men and women will be in full uniform and provide displays and talks about the role America played in World War I. It is free and suitable for all ages.
Participants: Long Island Living History Association (facebook.com/longislandlivinghistoryassociation), military historians whose main purpose is to educate the public on all wars America has participated in; the Ebony Doughboys (ebonydoughboys.org) a group of African American living historians who are focused on telling the story of the outstanding record of service of African Americans during the First World War; Mark D. Van Ells, author of “America and World War I: A Traveler’s Guide.” Actress Laurie Gaulke will represent women in the war with her show, “Doughnuts for Doughboys: A Salvation Army Lassie in Neuvilly.”
The events are free, open to the public, and run 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM at Governors Island National Monument. The displays will be on the Parade Ground and talks in and outside Castle Williams.
“We are proud to be part of ‘Doughboy Day’ on Governors Island” said Dr. Libby O’Connell, Chair of the World War I Centennial Committee for New York City. “Events like this bring the diverse history of the Great War alive for new generations. “
Colonel Robert J D’Alessandro (Ret.) Chairman of the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission observed, “This upcoming living history event on historic Governors Island will raise awareness of the innovations and the sacrifice that characterized America’s involvement in this ‘War to End All Wars’. I’m pleased that this commemoration will be part of the annual observances during the centennial. “
Schedule:
10:00-4:00: Displays of vintage artifacts, equipment, uniforms, and weapons. Parade Ground.
10:30: Opening remarks on Parade Ground.
11:00, 11:30, 12:00, 2:00, 3:30: “Eugene Bullard, America’s first black fighter pilot” (actor Chadd Gray). Gazebo outside Castle Williams.
11:30 and 3:30: “Doughnuts for Doughboys: A Salvation Army Lassie in Neuvilly” Castle Williams.
12:00: “Harlem Hell Fighters and the Black Doughboy experience.” Stories of: Pvts. Jenkins Fennell and Lewis A. Taylor. Presented by the Ebony Doughboys. Castle Williams.
12:30: Doughboy March from Parade Ground to Fort Jay and back to Castle Williams.
2:00: “America and World War I: A Traveler’s Guide” author Mark D. Van Ells. Castle Williams.
3:00: “Rediscovering the Doughboy Experience in WW1” artifacts presentation, Randy Gaulke, WW1 Historical Association. Castle Williams.
4:00: Doughboy March from Castle Williams to Meuse-Argonne Point.
5:00: End of event
Getting There:
Governors Island is located in New York Harbor, 1/2 mile from the southern tip of Lower Manhattan and 400 yards west of Brooklyn’s Red Hook waterfront. Ferry service is provided from Battery Maritime Building at 10 South Street on the corner of South and Whitehall Streets (next to the Staten Island ferry terminal). Ferry service is provided from Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Pier 6 at the end of Atlantic Avenue. Commercial ferry service is provided by the East River Ferry and serves several points on the East River. Ferries run every half hour. For a ferry schedule: https://govisland.com/info/ferry
Supporting Organizations:
Governors Island National Monument (nps.gov/gois) manages 22 acres containing Fort Jay and Castle Williams. The U.S. National Park Service provides education and historic interpretation of the island.
World War One Centennial Committee for New York City (wwi100nyc.org) is dedicated to planning, producing, and coordinating events and activities commemorating the First World War in New York City and the surrounding areas.
U.S. World War One Centennial Commission (worldwar1centennial.org) was created by Congress in 2013 to provide public outreach, education programs, and commemorative events for American involvement in World War I. The Commission was also authorized to build the new National World War I Memorial in Washington DC.

 

A call for writers

From Sergio Lugo, Editor, MPHS
I am writing to solicit articles for an upcoming issue of the Military Postal History Society Bulletin to be released in April 2017.  That Anniversary edition bulletin will commemorate the 100th Anniversary of the U.S. declaration of war in WWI and American involvement in the war.   The articles we publish always have to have a tie in to postal history.
The website of the MPHS is at www.militaryphs.org.  The website contains limited sections of MPHS Bulletins.  The Bulletins treat subjects for all wars, not just WWI.  Recent editions have included articles on tankless raining in WWI; the year 1916 and its import for the U.S. in WW I; special British mailing cards of WWI; the correspondence of a British captain KIA at Kut, Mesopotamia;  clandestine British censorship of U.S. mail,  and others.
The citation for issue # 2, 2017 lists the numerous articles we have lined up (either completed or pending) for that edition.  Attendees to the annual WW1HA seminar in October are welcome to submit articles for that issue – provided, of course, that it focuses on the U.S. and use supporting postal history.
Thank you for your time and consideration.

“100 CITIES/100 MEMORIALS”

WASHINGTON, DC:  The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission and the Pritzker Military Museum and Library have announced a new program to help people across the country restore and preserve local World War I memorials.
“100 CITIES/100 MEMORIALS” is a fund-matching program, where groups or individuals can A) identify local World War I memorials in their area, B) put together a conservation treatment proposal for a memorial in distress, C) submit their plan for consideration for matching grant funds, D) have the memorial treated by an accredited conservator, with communication help & possible matching funds.
The details of the program, including guidelines and online application form, can be found on the website www.ww1cc.org/100Memorials
The program is designed to foster a sense of heritage in local communities, to recognize local stories & people who were involved in the war, and create a way for community members to participate in the national World War I Centennial.
Kenneth Clarke, President and CEO of the Pritzker Military Museum & Library stated, “The words ‘Lest We Forget’ appear on World War I memorials across the nation. Sadly, however, many of these memorials are in need of conservation and restoration, in this, their centennial year.”
The 100 CITIES/100 MEMORIALS program is particularly well-suited for community-service projects hosted by school groups, scout troops, veteran group posts, historical/cultural organizations, faith groups, local sports teams, and others.
Dan Dayton, Executive Director of the Centennial Commission, commented
“Doughboys came from every town and village in the US. This program gives the Commission a way to say thank you in a very tangible way.”
The sponsor organizations have teamed with the World War I Memorial Inventory Project, which is assembling a crowd-sourced, online database to document and assess the condition of the thousands of World War I memorials across the country.
Some of the 100 CITIES/100 MEMORIALS program specifics include the following:
– All submitted projects will be given communication resources to help participants publicize their work, post imagery to social media, and tell their own stories.
–  Webinars & videos hosted on the Centennial Commission website will provide information about conserving memorials, researching a memorial’s history, and creating a project plan for submission.
– All World War I memorial projects are eligible to be considered for this program’s matching funds. However, the matching funds available per project is currently limited to $2,000, which is likely to be most useful for smaller projects.
– In November 2016, one hundred of the submitted projects will be selected by a jury to receive matching funds.
– To qualify for a matching grant, a project proposal needs to be submitted by November 11, 2016.  Memorials need to be located in the 50 states or US territories, and the preservation work must be completed (or have been completed) between January 1, 2014 and November 11, 2018.
This fund-matching program has been adopted by The American Legion by Resolution of the National Executive Committee. The Centennial Commission and the Pritzker Military Museum & Library welcome additional supporting organizations as well as additional sponsors to expand the funds available to the awardees.
Information on the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission can be found here
Information about the Pritzker Military Museum and Library can be found here
Information about the World War I Memorial Inventory Project can be found here

 

Do you belong to the WFA?

Here’s a list of the articles available at the Western Front Association website.

Welcome to the May 2016 issue of Trench Lines, the newsletter of The Western Front Association.

Plant a rose to remember someone who fought or served in other ways during the Battle of the Somme with ‘Tommy’s Rose’.

Create a ‘Memory Square’ of someone and it will be featured on the ‘Path of the Remembered’.

Engage with a local community event, with ‘The Living Memory Project’ – one of 141 events to emphasise that the Battle of the Somme lasted several months, not just a single day.

Go along to the study day ‘1916: The World at War’ courtesy of the First World War Research Group at the University of Wolverhampton on 28 May.

See Mike Sheil’s huge, evocative photographs of the Battlefields of the Somme in the exhibition ‘Fields of Battle, Lands of Peace 1916’ that opens in the City of London on 1 June.

Attend the two Western Front Association day long conferences with the joint title ‘A World At War 1916’. Our first conference is on 4 June ‘The Somme and Beyond’ in Birmingham and our second conference is on 9 July ‘Perspectives on the Somme’ in York.

Read reviews of First World War books by Western Front Association members: ‘Fatal Charge at Gallipoli’ reviewed by Richard Pursehouse; ‘Trapped Behind Enemy Lines’ reviewed by Dr. Giovanni Timmermans, and ‘Lancaster in the Great War’ reviewed by Simon Phillips.

Book Review: “Wilson”

 “Wilson”  By A. Scott Berg
(G. P. Putnam & Sons) 2013     818 pp
Review by WW1HA President Sal Compagno

Books for Kids: “Flyboys”

I am a Puffin children’s author and I’d like to tell you about my new children’s series, Wings which I hope will be of interest to aviation enthusiasts and their families associated with World War One Historical Association.

 I wrote Wings with RAF Museums as their children’s writer in residence in the run-up to the RAF’s 100th anniversary in 2018.  The Wings series is about four children at a football summer camp, who find themselves propelled back in time.  If they can learn how to fly the great RAF planes – the Sopwith Camel, Spitfire and Typhoon, history will lead them on a flightpath home to the present.

 “Tom is the RAF Museum’s Writer in Residence. His close relationship with the museums and his obsessive eye for detail mean that I was not at all surprised that his Wings books are both highly authentic and hugely exciting. These are Biggles books for the 21st century.” Phil Clayton, Education Office at RAF Museum 

 Publication dates:

Wings 1 : Flyboy 15 March 2016  available from Amazon now
Wings 2 : Spitfire 15 June 2016 
Wings 3 : Typhoon 15 August 2016 

 “Flyboy is like a cross between ‘Harry Potter’ and ‘Alex Rider’. I liked the book because it was spooky. The main character is Jatinder and the story is about World War One. It’s a total page turner! I think it is an amazing book. It attaches you to it straight away on the first sentence. “ Kamran Mustfa aged 8

 The Wings series feature:

·         Hardit Singh Malik – the first Sikh Indian to fly into combat with the Royal Flying Corps

·         airshows

·         flight simulators

·         military museums

·         female pilots

·         making model aircrafts.

 And each book comes with a simple model plane you can make yourself!

 Wings: Flyboy is a wonderful, warm tale. Stories highlighting the diversity of Britain’s troops during both world wars are rare and this one deserves a wide audience.  It is a cracking read.” Bali Rai

There is more information here : http://tompalmer.co.uk/wings/.

 

Winner of the Tomlinson Prize announced

We are pleased to announce that the annual Norman B. Tomlinson, Jr., prize for 2015 for the best work of history in English on World War I has been won by Dr. James Lyon, author of “Serbia and the Balkan Front, 1914: The Outbreak of the Great War” (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2015). Professor Lyon has studied the Balkans for over 34 years and currently works at the Austrian University of Graz’s Center for Southeast European Studies.
“Serbia and the Balkan Front, 1914” is the first history of the Great War to address in-depth the crucial events of 1914 as they played out on the Balkan Front. James Lyon demonstrates how blame for the war’s outbreak can be placed squarely on Austria-Hungary’s expansionist plans and internal political tensions, Serbian nationalism, South Slav aspirations, the unresolved Eastern Question, and a political assassination sponsored by renegade elements within Serbia’s security services. In doing so, he portrays the background and events of the Sarajevo assassination and the subsequent military campaigns and diplomacy on the Balkan Front during 1914.

The book details the first battle of the First World War, the first Allied victory and the massive military humiliations Austria-Hungary suffered at the hands of tiny Serbia, while discussing the oversized strategic role Serbia played for the Allies during 1914. Lyon challenges existing historiography that contends the Habsburg Army was ill-prepared for war and shows that the Dual Monarchy was in fact superior in manpower and technology to the Serbian army, thus laying blame on Austria-Hungary’s military leadership rather than on its state of readiness. 

Based on archival sources from Belgrade, Sarajevo and Vienna and using never-before-seen material to discuss secret negotiations between Turkey and Belgrade to carve up Albania, Serbia’s desertion epidemic, its near-surrender to Austria-Hungary in November 1914, and how Serbia became the first belligerent to openly proclaim its war aims, “Serbia and the Balkan Front, 1914” enriches our understanding of the outbreak of the war and Serbia’s role in modern Europe. It is of great importance to students and scholars of the history of the First World War as well as military, diplomatic and modern European history. 
James Lyon received a Ph.D. in Modern Balkan History at the University of California, Los Angeles (dissertation: The Forgotten Ally: Serbia and the Balkan Front, 1914), an M.A. in International Relations from Brigham Young University (thesis: Yugoslavia’s Post-World War Two Economic Development), and a B.A. in Russian Language and Literature from Brigham Young University. 
Dr. Lyon directed Balkan projects for the International Crisis Group for ten years: an accomplished analyst, he has written three books, many scholarly articles, dozens of published reports, numerous Op/Eds, and has testified before the U.S. Congress and parliamentary panels of EU member states. He has twenty years’ experience in conflict/post-conflict areas of the Balkans, worked on EU and USAID projects and with the Office of the High Representative, as well as in the private sector.

He is the founder of the Foundation for the Preservation of Historical Heritage, which is working with the National Library of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Historical Museum of Bosnia and Herzegovina to digitize their endangered collections.  www.fphh.org He is also an associate researcher with the University of Graz in Austria. 

Learn more about the winning book:

http://bloomsburyhistory.typepad.com/bloomsbury-history/2016/01/dr-james-lyon-wins-2015-tomlinson-prize-for-his-book-serbia-and-the-balkan-front-1914.html

The Tomlinson award winner is chosen by a panel chaired by Professor Dennis Showalter of Colorado College, a past president of the Society for Military History. Other panel members are Dr. Michael Neiberg, Professor at the US Army War College, and Graydon A. Tunstall, senior lecturer at the University of South Florida. The prize is made possible through a grant from Norman B. Tomlinson, Jr., director-emeritus of the Western Front Association – US Branch. (WFA-US became the World War One Historical Association in 2011.)
The panel chose this book because it takes a new look at the critical Balkan front using the latest archival evidence. Panel members were impressed that Lyon takes a transnational approach to the subject, setting the Serbian front into an international context. Serbia and the Balkan Front, 1914 analyzes diplomatic, political, and military arenas to give the fullest picture yet of events on the Balkans, the true fulcrum of 1914.

Book review: “A Mad Catastrophe”

A Mad Catastrophe  by  Geoffrey Wawro  (2014)

Reviewed by WW1HA President Sal Compagno

Geoffrey Wawro is professor of history in Texas and has written a painful study of the role
of the Austro-Hungarian military in the first six months of World War 1.  He relates how in
these first months the empire of the Hapsburgs was doomed to extinction.  Most emphatically, he emphasizes the deliberate intention of the Austrian government and military in starting
the war.  Revenge for the killing of the heir apparent, Austria knew attacking Serbia, whom
they believed instigated the assassination, would draw Russia in.  Blatantly unprepared for
war, her infantry had little or no training, she attacked Serbia, only to be thoroughly defeated
three times by an inferior but determined enemy.  Conrad von Hotzendorf, a palace General,
enjoyed the reputation as the most incompetent supreme military leader.  Gen. Potiorek,
whose military experience was minimal, led the disastrous Serbian ventures.

The Hungarians were described by Wawro as continually undermining all the Austrian efforts
before and during the war.  They refused to fund or modernize their joint armies nor were
they willing to cooperate in battle!  When both faced the Russian army in the east, they were
unable to achieve even the the most modicum of victory.  Exhausted by heat, long marches,
little food, they died or surrendered in thousands.  Losing enormous territory, they begged
assistance from the Germans, who reluctantly complied.  The first winter in the Carpathian
mountains saw their Austrian-Hungarian troops frozen.  Gross incompetence by their leadership led to over 800,000 casualties in six months!  The end of the empire was guaranteed.  Wawro has painted a sorrowful & agonizing portrait of a mad reckless nation.