Chime in, everyone! What books can we recommend for Andrea?

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There’s no way that you (my honorable internet reader) could know, but before I took on the dreadful task of typing this, I wrote it by hand in my journal. Partially because I was not near a computer and had some time and partially because my insistance on the outdated and impractical is a prevalent part of my personality. Much like, you might understand, the earlier era of my beloved (and dearly missed) homeland. Yes, before we were spending Balaton summers dancing and toasting Franco-ised Pálinka (sweet fruit pálinka with perrier) we were cursing and refusing to clink glasses (er..plastic cups) because that’s what the Austrian oppressors did! Uh huh… outdated and impractical (include here: Magyar stubborness) not a history of the First World War would be complete without such a description of Austria-Hungary.

On some level, I will be participating in the “War Through the Generations” reading challenge and that…

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3 thoughts on “

  1. I can make a couple of suggestions. First, I’d suggest a book by one of our WW1HA board members, Graydon (Jack) Tunstall. His 2010 book, “Blood on the Snow: the Carpathian Winter War of 1915”, won an Honorable Mention in our Tomlinson Book Prize last year. I often associate the First World War with futility, but Jack’s book makes it clear that the futile campaigns of Gallipoli and Paschendale are nothing compared to the battles in the Carpathians between the Austro-Hungarian and Russian empires.

    My 2nd suggestion is Peter Englund’s “The Beauty and the Sorrow: An Intimate History of the First World War”. The English translation was published in 2011 by Knopf. It follows 20 individuals who kept good diaries through the war, including a 20-year-old Hungarian cavalryman in the A-H army. The best part of this book is that it covers every theater and just about every nationality. The diarists range from a 12-year-old German schoolgirl to an Italian-American infantryman in the Italian army.

    –Steve Suddaby, President, WW1HA

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